Linking Developmental Experiences to Strategy

Biz09-HON-1217-newscomA recent post on the original key developmental events research got me thinking about how people in organizations end up with the opportunity to have capability-building experiences.

It’s true that ongoing research has brought increasing clarity to the kinds of events that build capability such as high-visibility project assignments, managing a larger scope, influencing without authority, and proving yourself. Many individuals seek out these kinds of challenges and accelerate their own development. Still, the process of connecting the right experience with the right individual is often left to chance.

I recently sat in on a development program in Honeywell that doesn’t leave the process to chance. The program, the Transportation Systems (TS) Value Drivers Academy, accelerates the development of senior leaders within Honeywell’s turbocharger business. The program connects people with developmental experiences while focusing top talent on key strategic priorities.

Prior to the program kickoff, top management within the TS business identified several key projects for advancing strategic objectives. For example, one project involved investigating how a technology from another Honeywell business could be applied to improving efficiency in a turbocharger. After participating in a face-to-face workshop to build key project skills, leadership acumen, and an innovation mindset, small teams were assigned one of the projects.

Each project has a designated top-management champion/coach, and the whole program is sponsored by the president of the TS business. The project groups have several months to work on their projects, giving regular updates to each sponsor and finally presenting results to the TS management.

There are a few things I really like about this program.

  • The central focus of the program is actual strategic work that the business needs accomplished. This means the investment is not “only” about training, it helps further key business goals.
  • These projects have clear sponsors. I’ve seen programs like this where the participants come up with their own projects they hope to sell to a sponsor. Often the project outcomes get shelved. In this case the projects have buy in and sponsorship before the program even begins.
  • The training part of the program was directly linked to skills the teams would have to immediately use in their projects. In all the discussion about 70-20-10, positioning training to support immediate application is an essential part of solidifying learning.
  • The projects—and the positioning of these projects in the business—have the ingredients of excellent developmental assignments: (1) the assignments are project-based, (2) the projects have high visibility, (3) the teams have to accomplish their objectives without formal line authority, and (4) the stakes are high—top management is watching closely.

Over the years, the program has directly led to several key innovations used by the Honeywell turbocharger business—all while playing a key role in developing critical talent. That’s a win-win if I ever saw one.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>