Tag Archives: learning from experience

The Other Side Of What We Know About Experience: Understanding Our Misunderstandings

silver-bridgeCall it the Freakonomics effect, but the unexplored side of things has always intrigued me. Many of us who read and contribute to this blog are committed to understanding the research-based principles of experience-driven leader development and applying those to our organizations, our colleagues, direct reports and mentees and, hopefully, ourselves. So rather than go further down the path of contributing to what we know, I’d like to spend a few moments on the flipside and do some myth busting.

Despite all we have come to understand and the corresponding practices we’ve developed, a great many outside our field have yet to grasp the important role that experience plays in development. The blind spots they’ve developed about why and how to leverage experience are both driven and sustained by some misunderstandings of what “experience” is and how it benefits learning and development.

This pain point was nagging at me as I was working on my upcoming book on leader development and so I turned a spotlight on three common and persistent misunderstandings I’ve come across in hopes that by calling attention to them, others might become more self-aware and proactively avoid getting tripped up by them. By the same token, the more we as practitioners know about what others don’t know, the better we can steer them to the useful truth.

Misunderstanding #1: Experience Is What’s On Your Resume

Much attention is given to work experiences that take place on the job, but work isn’t the only place where valuable learning can occur. In fact, many individuals who excel at learning from experience will share that some of their most valuable lessons learned have come from experiences they’ve had outside of work.

Just because learning takes place in a setting other than work doesn’t mean that the lessons can’t be successfully adapted to a work challenge. One individual shared the rather gut-wrenching experience he went through in trying to mediate a family dispute over who should inherit an uncle’s property. Through the experience, he learned a lot about dealing with diverse stakeholders under very emotional circumstances where there was a lot to lose. He later found that the insights and skills he gained from this experience proved quite valuable in negotiating multiparty contracts where interests diverged and emotions ran high.

Misunderstanding #2: Learning on the Job Is Mostly About Learning to Do Your Job More Effectively

Different on-the-job experiences teach different things. Specifically, the lessons learned from any experience can potentially fall into three different “worlds”: The World of Work, the World of People, and the World of Self. The lessons that teach us about the self are sometimes the most profound – and the most difficult. They often stem from a particular category of experience we call hardships. (For more on hardships, see my April 2014 post in this blog.)

Misunderstanding #3: Learning from Experience Is an Event

Learning from experience is an ongoing process, not an event. Because of the way that past and present interact, learning from experience never ends. Different perspectives emerge over time. Also, a lesson isn’t truly learned until it’s applied. Until you can apply the insights you’ve gained from your previous experiences, their true value lies unrealized.

In the spirit of transparency, this is an anecdotal list of misunderstandings based on years of coaching and consulting, and not empirically based. I would suspect that many of you reading this have encountered other limiting mindsets that potentially undermine the value of experience to leader development. I encourage you to share the misunderstandings you’ve encountered and contribute to our shared understanding.